gag


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Gag \Gag\, n.
   1. Something thrust into the mouth or throat to hinder
      speaking.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. A mouthful that makes one retch; a choking bit; as, a gag
      of mutton fat. --Lamb.
      [1913 Webster]

   3. A speech or phrase interpolated offhand by an actor on the
      stage in his part as written, usually consisting of some
      seasonable or local allusion. [Slang]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Gag \Gag\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Gagged; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Gagging.] [Prob. fr. W. cegio to choke or strangle, fr. ceg
   mouth, opening, entrance.]
   1. To stop the mouth of, by thrusting sometimes in, so as to
      hinder speaking; hence, to silence by authority or by
      violence; not to allow freedom of speech to. --Marvell.
      [1913 Webster]

            The time was not yet come when eloquence was to be
            gagged, and reason to be hood winked. --Maccaulay.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. To pry or hold open by means of a gag.
      [1913 Webster]

            Mouths gagged to such a wideness.     --Fortescue
                                                  (Transl.).
      [1913 Webster]

   3. To cause to heave with nausea.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Gag \Gag\, v. i.
   1. To heave with nausea; to retch.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. To introduce gags or interpolations. See Gag, n., 3.
      [Slang] --Cornill Mag.
      [1913 Webster]
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