gage


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Gage \Gage\ (g[=a]j), n. [F. gage, LL. gadium, wadium; of German
   origin; cf. Goth. wadi, OHG. wetti, weti, akin to E. wed. See
   Wed, and cf. Wage, n.]
   1. A pledge or pawn; something laid down or given as a
      security for the performance of some act by the person
      depositing it, and forfeited by nonperformance; security.
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            Nor without gages to the needy lend.  --Sandys.
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   2. A glove, cap, or the like, cast on the ground as a
      challenge to combat, and to be taken up by the accepter of
      the challenge; a challenge; a defiance. "There I throw my
      gage." --Shak.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Gage \Gage\, n.
   A measure or standard. See Gauge, n.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Gage \Gage\, v. t.
   To measure. See Gauge, v. t.
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         You shall not gage me
         By what we do to-night.                  --Shak.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Gage \Gage\ (g[=a]j), n. [So called because an English family
   named Gage imported the greengage from France, in the last
   century.]
   A variety of plum; as, the greengage; also, the blue gage,
   frost gage, golden gage, etc., having more or less likeness
   to the greengage. See Greengage.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Gage \Gage\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Gaged (g[=a]jd); p. pr & vb.
   n. Gaging (g[=a]"j[i^]ng).] [Cf. F. gager. See Gage, n.,
   a pledge.]
   1. To give or deposit as a pledge or security for some act;
      to wage or wager; to pawn or pledge. [Obs.]
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            A moiety competent
            Was gaged by our king.                --Shak.
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   2. To bind by pledge, or security; to engage.
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            Great debts
            Wherein my time, sometimes too prodigal,
            Hath left me gaged.                   --Shak.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Gauge \Gauge\ (g[=a]j), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Gauged; p. pr. &
   vb. n. Gauging] [OF. gaugier, F. jauger, cf. OF. gauge
   gauge, measuring rod, F. jauge; of uncertain origin; perh.
   fr. an assumed L. qualificare to determine the qualities of a
   thing (see Qualify); but cf. also F. jalon a measuring
   stake in surveying, and E. gallon.] [Written also gage.]
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   1. To measure or determine with a gauge.
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   2. To measure or to ascertain the contents or the capacity
      of, as of a pipe, barrel, or keg.
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   3. (Mech.) To measure the dimensions of, or to test the
      accuracy of the form of, as of a part of a gunlock.
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            The vanes nicely gauged on each side. --Derham.
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   4. To draw into equidistant gathers by running a thread
      through it, as cloth or a garment.
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   5. To measure the capacity, character, or ability of; to
      estimate; to judge of.
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            You shall not gauge me
            By what we do to-night.               --Shak.
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