gig


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Gig \Gig\, n.
   A kind of spear or harpoon. See Fishgig.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Gig \Gig\, v. t.
   To fish with a gig.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Gig \Gig\, n. [OE. gigge. Cf. Giglot.]
   A playful or wanton girl; a giglot.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Gig \Gig\, n. [Cf. Icel. g[imac]gja fiddle, MHG. g[imac]ge, G.
   geige, Icel. geiga to take a wrong direction, rove at random,
   and E. jig.]
   1. A top or whirligig; any little thing that is whirled round
      in play.
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            Thou disputest like an infant; go, whip thy gig.
                                                  --Shak.
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   2. A light carriage, with one pair of wheels, drawn by one
      horse; a kind of chaise.
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   3. (Naut.) A long, light rowboat, generally clinkerbuilt, and
      designed to be fast; a boat appropriated to the use of the
      commanding officer; as, the captain's gig.
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   4. (Mach.) A rotatory cylinder, covered with wire teeth or
      teasels, for teaseling woolen cloth.
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   Gig machine, Gigging machine, Gig mill, or {Napping
   machine}. See Gig, 4.

   Gig saw. See Jig saw.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Gig \Gig\, n.
   A job for a specified, usually short period of time; -- used
   especially for the temporary engagements of an entertainer,
   such as a jazz musician or a rock group; as, a one-week gig
   in Las Vegas.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Gig \Gig\ (j[i^]g or g[i^]g), n. [Cf. OF. gigue. See Jig, n.]
   A fiddle. [Obs.]
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Gig \Gig\ (g[i^]g), v. t. [Prob. fr. L. gignere to beget.]
   To engender. [Obs.] --Dryden.
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