graph


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

-graph \-graph\ (-gr[.a]f) [From Gr. gra`fein to write. See
   Graphic.]
   A suffix signifying something written (as in digraph), a
   writing; also, a writer or an instrument that produces a
   written or visible record of a measurement, such as a
   spectrograph; as, autograph, crystograph, telegraph,
   photograph.
   [1913 Webster +PJC]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Graph \Graph\ (gr[.a]f), n. [See -graph.] (Math.)
   1. A curve or surface, the locus of a point whose coordinates
      are the variables in the equation of the locus; as, a
      graph of the exponential function.
      [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

   2. A diagram symbolizing a system of interrelations of
      variable quantities using points represented by spots, or
      by lines to represent the relations of continuous
      variables. More than one set of interrelations may be
      presented on one graph, in which case the spots or lines
      are typically distinguishable from each other, as by
      color, shape, thickness, continuity, etc. A diagram in
      which relationships between variables are represented by
      other visual means is sometimes called a graph, as in a
      bar graph, but may also be called a chart.
      [Webster 1913 Suppl. +PJC]
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