grind


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Grind \Grind\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Ground; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Grinding.] [AS. grindan; perh. akin to L. frendere to
   gnash, grind. Cf. Grist.]
   1. To reduce to powder by friction, as in a mill, or with the
      teeth; to crush into small fragments; to produce as by the
      action of millstones.
      [1913 Webster]

            Take the millstones, and grind meal.  --Is. xivii.
                                                  2.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. To wear down, polish, or sharpen, by friction; to make
      smooth, sharp, or pointed; to whet, as a knife or drill;
      to rub against one another, as teeth, etc.
      [1913 Webster]

   3. To oppress by severe exactions; to harass.
      [1913 Webster]

            To grind the subject or defraud the prince.
                                                  --Dryden.
      [1913 Webster]

   4. To study hard for examination; -- commonly used with away;
      as, to grind away at one's studies. [College Slang]
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Grind \Grind\, v. i.
   1. To perform the operation of grinding something; to turn
      the millstones.
      [1913 Webster]

            Send thee
            Into the common prison, there to grind. --Milton.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. To become ground or pulverized by friction; as, this corn
      grinds well.
      [1913 Webster]

   3. To become polished or sharpened by friction; as, glass
      grinds smooth; steel grinds to a sharp edge.
      [1913 Webster]

   4. To move with much difficulty or friction; to grate.
      [1913 Webster]

   5. To perform hard and distasteful service; to drudge; to
      study hard, as for an examination. --Farrar.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Grind \Grind\, n.
   1. The act of reducing to powder, or of sharpening, by
      friction.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. Any severe continuous work or occupation; esp., hard and
      uninteresting study. [Colloq.] --T. Hughes.
      [1913 Webster]

   3. A student that studies hard; a dig; a wonk. [College
      Slang]
      [1913 Webster +PJC]
Feedback Form