jaunt


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Jaunt \Jaunt\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Jaunted; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Jaunting.] [Cf. Scot. jaunder to ramble, jaunt to taunt,
   jeer, dial. Sw. ganta to play the buffoon, romp, jest; perh.
   akin to E. jump. Cf. Jaunce.]
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   1. To ramble here and there; to stroll; to make an excursion.
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   2. To ride on a jaunting car.
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   Jaunting car, a kind of low-set open vehicle, used in
      Ireland, in which the passengers ride sidewise, sitting
      back to back. [Written also jaunty car.] --Thackeray.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Jaunt \Jaunt\, v. t.
   To jolt; to jounce. [Obs.] --Bale.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Jaunt \Jaunt\, n.
   1. A wearisome journey. [R.]
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            Our Savior, meek, and with untroubled mind
            After his a["e]ry jaunt, though hurried sore.
            Hungry and cold, betook him to his rest. --Milton.
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   2. A short excursion for pleasure or refreshment; a ramble; a
      short journey.
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