joke


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Joke \Joke\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Joked; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Joking.]
   To make merry with; to make jokes upon; to rally; to banter;
   as, to joke a comrade.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Joke \Joke\, v. i. [L. jocari.]
   To do something for sport, or as a joke; to be merry in words
   or actions; to jest.
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         He laughed, shouted, joked, and swore.   --Macaulay.

   Syn: To jest; sport; rally; banter. See Jest.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Joke \Joke\, n. [L. jocus. Cf Jeopardy, Jocular, Juggler.]
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   1. Something said for the sake of exciting a laugh; something
      witty or sportive (commonly indicating more of hilarity or
      humor than jest); a jest; a witticism; as, to crack
      good-natured jokes.
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            And gentle dullness ever loves a joke. --Pope.
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            Or witty joke our airy senses moves
            To pleasant laughter.                 --Gay.
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   2. Something not said seriously, or not actually meant;
      something done in sport.
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            Inclose whole downs in walls, 't is all a joke.
                                                  --Pope.
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   In joke, in jest; sportively; not meant seriously.

   Practical joke. See under Practical.
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