only


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Only \On"ly\, a. [OE. only, anly, onlich, AS. [=a]nlic, i.e.,
   onelike. See One, and Like, a.]
   1. One alone; single; as, the only man present; his only
      occupation.
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   2. Alone in its class; by itself; not associated with others
      of the same class or kind; as, an only child.
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   3. Hence, (figuratively): Alone, by reason of superiority;
      preeminent; chief. "Motley's the only wear." --Shak.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Only \On"ly\, adv. [See Only, a.]
   1. In one manner or degree; for one purpose alone; simply;
      merely; barely.
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            And to be loved himself, needs only to be known.
      --Dryden.
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   2. So and no otherwise; no other than; exclusively; solely;
      wholly. "She being only wicked." --Beau. & Fl.
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            Every imagination . . . of his heart was only evil.
                                                  --Gen. vi. 5.
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   3. Singly; without more; as, only-begotten.
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   4. Above all others; particularly. [Obs.]
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            His most only elected mistress.       --Marston.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Only \On"ly\, conj.
   Save or except (that); -- an adversative used elliptically
   with or without that, and properly introducing a single fact
   or consideration.
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         He might have seemed some secretary or clerk . . . only
         that his low, flat, unadorned cap . . . indicated that
         he belonged to the city.                 --Sir W.
                                                  Scott.
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