overlay


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Overlay \O"ver*lay`\, n.
   1. A covering. --Sir W. Scott.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. (Printing) A piece of paper pasted upon the tympan sheet
      to improve the impression by making it stronger at a
      particular place.
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   3. (Computers) A subroutine which occupies a portion of main
      memory which is occupied at some other time by another
      subroutine during execution of the same program. Overlays
      were used as an older technique to allow larger programs
      to be executed in restricted main memory space; the same
      effect is now accomplished by different techniques.
      [PJC]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Overlay \O`ver*lay"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Overlaid; p. pr. &
   vb. n. Overlaying.]
   1. To lay, or spread, something over or across; hence, to
      cover; to overwhelm; to press excessively upon.
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            When any country is overlaid by the multitude which
            live upon it.                         --Sir W.
                                                  Raleigh.
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            As when a cloud his beams doth overlay. --Spenser.
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            Framed of cedar overlaid with gold.   --Milton.
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            And overlay
            With this portentous bridge the dark abyss.
                                                  --Milton.
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   2. Specifically: To cover (an object made of an inexpensive
      metal, glass, or other material) with a thin sheet of an
      expensive metal, especially with silver or gold.
      Distinguished from to plate, which is done by a chemical
      or electrical deposition process.
      [PJC]

   3. To smother with a close covering, or by lying upon.
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            This woman's child died in the night; because she
            overlaid it.                          --1 Kings iii.
                                                  19.
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            A heap of ashes that o'erlays your fire. --Dryden.
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   4. (Printing) To put an overlay on.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Overlie \O`ver*lie"\, v. t. [imp. Overlay; p. p. Overlain;
   p. pr. & vb. n. Overlying.]
   To lie over or upon; specifically, to suffocate by lying
   upon; as, to overlie an infant. --Quain.
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         A woman by negligence overlieth her child in her
         sleeping.                                --Chaucer.
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