rumble


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Rumble \Rum"ble\, v. t.
   To cause to pass through a rumble, or shaking machine. See
   Rumble, n., 4.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Rumble \Rum"ble\, v. i. [OE. romblen, akin to D. rommelen, G.
   rumpeln, Dan. rumle; cf. Icel. rymja to roar.]
   1. To make a low, heavy, continued sound; as, the thunder
      rumbles at a distance.
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            In the mean while the skies 'gan rumble sore.
                                                  --Surrey.
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            The people cried and rombled up and down. --Chaucer.
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   2. To murmur; to ripple.
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            To rumble gently down with murmur soft. --Spenser.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Rumble \Rum"ble\, n.
   1. A noisy report; rumor. [Obs.]
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            Delighting ever in rumble that is new. --Chaucer.
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   2. A low, heavy, continuous sound like that made by heavy
      wagons or the reverberation of thunder; a confused noise;
      as, the rumble of a railroad train.
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            Clamor and rumble, and ringing and clatter.
                                                  --Tennyson.
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            Merged in the rumble of awakening day. --H. James.
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   3. A seat for servants, behind the body of a carriage.
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            Kit, well wrapped, . . . was in the rumble behind.
                                                  --Dickens.
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   4. A rotating cask or box in which small articles are
      smoothed or polished by friction against each other.
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