underground


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Subway \Sub"way`\, n.
   1. An underground way or gallery; especially, a passage under
      a street, in which water mains, gas mains, telegraph
      wires, etc., are conducted.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. An underground railroad, usually having trains powered by
      electricity provided by an electric line running through
      the underground tunnel. It is usually confined to the
      center portion of cities; -- called also tube, and in
      Britain, underground. In certain other countries (as in
      France or Russia) it is called the metro.
      [PJC]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Underground \Un"der*ground`\, adv.
   Beneath the surface of the earth.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Underground \Un"der*ground`\, n.
   1. The place or space beneath the surface of the ground;
      subterranean space.
      [1913 Webster]

            A spirit raised from depth of underground. --Shak.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. a subway or subway system, especially in the United
      Kingdom. [chiefly British]
      [PJC]

   3. a secret organization opposed to the prevailing
      government; as, the French underground during the Nazi
      occupation.
      [PJC]

   4. a group or movement holding unorthodox views in an
      environment where conventional ideas dominate, as in
      artistic circles.
      [PJC]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Underground \Un"der*ground`\, a.
   1. Being below the surface of the ground; as, an underground
      story or apartment.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. Done or occurring out of sight; secret. [Colloq.]
      [1913 Webster]

   Underground railroad or Underground railway. See under
      Railroad.
      [1913 Webster]
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