upset


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Upset \Up*set"\, v. i.
   To become upset.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Upset \Up"set`\, a.
   Set up; fixed; determined; -- used chiefly or only in the
   phrase upset price; that is, the price fixed upon as the
   minimum for property offered in a public sale, or, in an
   auction, the price at which property is set up or started by
   the auctioneer, and the lowest price at which it will be
   sold.
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         After a solemn pause, Mr. Glossin offered the upset
         price for the lands and barony of Ellangowan. --Sir W.
                                                  Scott.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Upset \Up"set`\, n.
   The act of upsetting, or the state of being upset; an
   overturn; as, the wagon had an upset.
   [1913 Webster]
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Upset \Up*set"\, v. t.
   1. To set up; to put upright. [Obs.] "With sail on mast
      upset." --R. of Brunne.
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   2.
      (a) To thicken and shorten, as a heated piece of iron, by
          hammering on the end.
      (b) To shorten (a tire) in the process of resetting,
          originally by cutting it and hammering on the ends.
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   3. To overturn, overthrow, or overset; as, to upset a
      carriage; to upset an argument. "Determined somehow to
      upset the situation." --Mrs. Humphry Ward.
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   4. To disturb the self-possession of; to disorder the nerves
      of; to make ill; as, the fright upset her. [Colloq.]
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   5. (Basketwork) To turn upwards the outer ends of (stakes) so
      as to make a foundation for the side of a basket or the
      like; also, to form (the side) in this manner.
      [Webster 1913 Suppl.]
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