van


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Van \Van\, n. [L. vannus a van, or fan for winnowing grain: cf.
   F. van. Cf. Fan, Van a wing Winnow.]
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   1. A fan or other contrivance, as a sieve, for winnowing
      grain.
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   2. [OF. vanne, F. vanneau beam feather (cf. It. vanno a wing)
      fr. L. vannus. See Etymology above.] A wing with which the
      air is beaten. [Archaic] "[/Angels] on their plumy vans
      received him. " --Milton.
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            He wheeled in air, and stretched his vans in vain;
            His vans no longer could his flight sustain.
                                                  --Dryden.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Van \Van\, n. [Abbrev. fr. vanguard.]
   The front of an army; the first line or leading column; also,
   the front line or foremost division of a fleet, either in
   sailing or in battle.
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         Standards and gonfalons, twixt van and rear,
         Stream in the air.                       --Milton.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Van \Van\, n. [Cornish.] (Mining)
   A shovel used in cleansing ore.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Van \Van\, v. t. (Mining)
   To wash or cleanse, as a small portion of ore, on a shovel.
   --Raymond.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Van \Van\, n. [Abbreviated from caravan.]
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   1. A light wagon, either covered or open, used by tradesmen
      and others for the transportation of goods. [Eng.]
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   2. A large covered wagon for moving furniture, etc., also for
      conveying wild beasts, etc., for exhibition.
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   3. A closed railway car for baggage. See the Note under
      Car, 2. [Eng.]
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Van \Van\, v. t. [Cf. F. vanner to winnow, to fan. See Van a
   winnowing machine.]
   To fan, or to cleanse by fanning; to winnow. [Obs.] --Bacon.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Caravan \Car"a*van\ (k[a^]r"[.a]*v[a^]n or k[a^]r*[.a]*v[a^]n";
   277), n. [F. caravane (cf. Sp. caravana), fr. Per. karw[=a]n
   a caravan (in sense 1). Cf. Van a wagon.]
   1. A company of travelers, pilgrims, or merchants, organized
      and equipped for a long journey, or marching or traveling
      together, esp. through deserts and countries infested by
      robbers or hostile tribes, as in Asia or Africa.
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   2. A large, covered wagon, or a train of such wagons, for
      conveying wild beasts, etc., for exhibition; an itinerant
      show, as of wild beasts.
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   3. A covered vehicle for carrying passengers or for moving
      furniture, etc.; -- sometimes shorted into van.
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