versed


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Versed \Versed\, a. [L. versus turned, p. p. vertere. See 1st
   Versed.] (Math.)
   Turned.
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   Versed sine. See under Sine, and Illust. of Functions.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Verse \Verse\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Versed (v[~e]rst); p. pr. &
   vb. n. Versing.]
   To tell in verse, or poetry. [Obs.]
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         Playing on pipes of corn and versing love. --Shak.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Versed \Versed\ (v[~e]rst), a. [Cf. F. vers['e], L. versatus, p.
   p. of versari to turn about frequently, to turn over, to be
   engaged in a thing, passive of versare. See Versant, a.]
   Acquainted or familiar, as the result of experience, study,
   practice, etc.; skilled; practiced; knowledgeable; expert.
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         Deep versed in books and shallow in himself. --Milton.
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         Opinions . . . derived from studying the Scriptures,
         wherein he was versed beyond any person of his age.
                                                  --Southey.
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         These men were versed in the details of business.
                                                  --Macaulay.
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