vulgate


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Vulgate \Vul"gate\, a.
   Of or pertaining to the Vulgate, or the old Latin version of
   the Scriptures.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Vulgate \Vul"gate\, n. [NL. vulgata, from L. vulgatus usual,
   common, p. p. of vulgare to make general, or common, fr.
   vulgus the multitude: cf. F. vulgate. See Vulgar, a.]
   An ancient Latin version of the Scripture, and the only
   version which the Roman Church admits to be authentic; -- so
   called from its common use in the Latin Church.
   [1913 Webster]

   Note: The Vulgate was made by Jerome at the close of the 4th
         century. The Old Testament he translated mostly from
         the Hebrew and Chaldaic, and the New Testament he
         revised from an older Latin version. The Douay version,
         so called, is an English translation from the Vulgate.
         See Douay Bible.
         [1913 Webster]
Feedback Form