whiffle


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Whiffle \Whif"fle\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Whiffled; p. pr. & vb.
   n. Whiffling.] [Freq. of whiff to puff, perhaps influenced
   by D. weifelen to waver.]
   [1913 Webster]
   1. To waver, or shake, as if moved by gusts of wind; to
      shift, turn, or veer about. --D?mpier.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. To change from one opinion or course to another; to use
      evasions; to prevaricate; to be fickle.
      [1913 Webster]

            A person of whiffing and unsteady turn of mind can
            not keep close to a point of controversy. --I.
                                                  Watts.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Whiffle \Whif"fle\, v. t.
   [1913 Webster]
   1. To disperse with, or as with, a whiff, or puff; to
      scatter. [Obs.] --Dr. H. More.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. To wave or shake quickly; to cause to whiffle.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Whiffle \Whif"fle\, n.
   A fife or small flute. [Obs.] --Douce.
   [1913 Webster]
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