wicked


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Wicked \Wick"ed\ (w[i^]k"[e^]d), a. [OE. wicked, fr. wicke
   wicked; probably originally the same word as wicche wizard,
   witch. See Witch.]
   [1913 Webster]
   1. Evil in principle or practice; deviating from morality;
      contrary to the moral or divine law; addicted to vice or
      sin; sinful; immoral; profligate; -- said of persons and
      things; as, a wicked king; a wicked woman; a wicked deed;
      wicked designs.
      [1913 Webster]

            Hence, then, and evil go with thee along,
            Thy offspring, to the place of evil, hell,
            Thou and thy wicked crew!             --Milton.
      [1913 Webster]

            Never, never, wicked man was wise.    --Pope.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. Cursed; baneful; hurtful; bad; pernicious; dangerous.
      [Obs.] "Wicked dew." --Shak.
      [1913 Webster]

            This were a wicked way, but whoso had a guide. --P.
                                                  Plowman.
      [1913 Webster]

   3. Ludicrously or sportively mischievous; disposed to
      mischief; roguish. [Colloq.]
      [1913 Webster]

            Pen looked uncommonly wicked.         --Thackeray.
      [1913 Webster]

   Syn: Iniquitous; sinful; criminal; guilty; immoral; unjust;
        unrighteous; unholy; irreligious; ungodly; profane;
        vicious; pernicious; atrocious; nefarious; heinous;
        flagrant; flagitious; abandoned. See Iniquitous.
        [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Wicked \Wicked\ (w[i^]kt), a.
   Having a wick; -- used chiefly in composition; as, a
   two-wicked lamp.
   [1913 Webster]
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