wile


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Wile \Wile\, v. t.
   1. To practice artifice upon; to deceive; to beguile; to
      allure. [R.] --Spenser.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. To draw or turn away, as by diversion; to while or while
      away; to cause to pass pleasantly. --Tennyson.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Wile \Wile\, n. [OE. wile, AS. w[imac]l; cf. Icel. v?l, v[ae]l.
   Cf. Guile.]
   A trick or stratagem practiced for insnaring or deception; a
   sly, insidious; artifice; a beguilement; an allurement.
   [1913 Webster]

         Put on the whole armor of God, that ye may be able to
         stand against the wiles of the devil.    --Eph. vi. 11.
   [1913 Webster]

         Not more almighty to resist our might,
         Than wise to frustrate all our plots and wiles.
                                                  --Milton.
   [1913 Webster]
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