wimple


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Wimple \Wim"ple\, v. i.
   To lie in folds; also, to appear as if laid in folds or
   plaits; to ripple; to undulate. "Wimpling waves."
   --Longfellow.
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         For with a veil, that wimpled everywhere,
         Her head and face was hid.               --Spenser.
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         With me through . . . meadows stray,
         Where wimpling waters make their way.    --Ramsay.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Wimple \Wim"ple\, n. [OE. wimpel, AS. winpel; akin to D. & G.
   wimpel a pennant, streamer, OHG. wimpal a veil, Icel.
   vimpill, Dan. & Sw. vimpel a pennant, streamer; of uncertain
   origin. Cf. Gimp.]
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   1. A covering of silk, linen, or other material, for the neck
      and chin, formerly worn by women as an outdoor protection,
      and still retained in the dress of nuns.
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            Full seemly her wympel ipinched is.   --Chaucer.
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            For she had laid her mournful stole aside,
            And widowlike sad wimple thrown away. --Spenser.
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            Then Vivian rose,
            And from her brown-locked head the wimple throws.
                                                  --M. Arnold.
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   2. A flag or streamer. --Weale.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Wimple \Wim"ple\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Wimpled; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Wimpling.]
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   1. To clothe with a wimple; to cover, as with a veil; hence,
      to hoodwink. "She sat ywympled well." --Chaucer.
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            This wimpled, whining, purblind, wayward boy.
                                                  --Shak.
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   2. To draw down, as a veil; to lay in folds or plaits, as a
      veil.
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   3. To cause to appear as if laid in folds or plaits; to cause
      to ripple or undulate; as, the wind wimples the surface of
      water.
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