worst


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Worst \Worst\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Worsted; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Worsting.] [See Worse, v. t. & a.]
   To gain advantage over, in contest or competition; to get the
   better of; to defeat; to overthrow; to discomfit.
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         The . . . Philistines were worsted by the captivated
         ark.                                     --South.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Worst \Worst\, v. i.
   To grow worse; to deteriorate. [R.] "Every face . . .
   worsting." --Jane Austen.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Worst \Worst\, a., superl. of Bad. [OE. werst, worste, wurste,
   AS. wyrst, wierst, wierrest. See Worse, a.]
   Bad, evil, or pernicious, in the highest degree, whether in a
   physical or moral sense. See Worse. "Heard so oft in worst
   extremes." --Milton.
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         I have a wife, the worst that may be.    --Chaucer.
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         If thou hadst not been born the worst of men,
         Thou hadst been a knave and flatterer.   --Shak.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Worst \Worst\, n.
   That which is most bad or evil; the most severe, pernicious,
   calamitous, or wicked state or degree.
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         The worst is not
         So long as we can say, This is the worst. --Shak.
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         He is always sure of finding diversion when the worst
         comes to the worst.                      --Addison.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Bad \Bad\ (b[a^]d), a. [Compar. Worse (w[^u]s); superl.
   Worst (w[^u]st).] [Probably fr. AS. b[ae]ddel
   hermaphrodite; cf. b[ae]dling effeminate fellow.]
   Wanting good qualities, whether physical or moral; injurious,
   hurtful, inconvenient, offensive, painful, unfavorable, or
   defective, either physically or morally; evil; vicious;
   wicked; -- the opposite of good; as, a bad man; bad
   conduct; bad habits; bad soil; bad air; bad health; a bad
   crop; bad news.

   Note: Sometimes used substantively.
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               The strong antipathy of good to bad. --Pope.
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   Syn: Pernicious; deleterious; noxious; baneful; injurious;
        hurtful; evil; vile; wretched; corrupt; wicked; vicious;
        imperfect.
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