zeal


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Zeal \Zeal\, v. i.
   To be zealous. [Obs. & R.] --Bacon.
   [1913 Webster]
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Zeal \Zeal\ (z[=e]l), n. [F. z[`e]le; cf. Pg. & It. zelo, Sp.
   zelo, celo; from L. zelus, Gr. ?, probably akin to ? to boil.
   Cf. Yeast, Jealous.]
   [1913 Webster]
   1. Passionate ardor in the pursuit of anything; eagerness in
      favor of a person or cause; ardent and active interest;
      engagedness; enthusiasm; fervor. "Ambition varnished o'er
      with zeal." --Milton. "Zeal, the blind conductor of the
      will." --Dryden. "Zeal's never-dying fire." --Keble.
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            I bear them record that they have a zeal of God, but
            not according to knowledge.           --Rom. x. 2.
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            A zeal for liberty is sometimes an eagerness to
            subvert with little care what shall be established.
                                                  --Johnson.
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   2. A zealot. [Obs.] --B. Jonson.
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