beneath


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Beneath \Be*neath"\, prep. [OE. benethe, bineo[eth]en, AS.
   beneo[eth]an, beny[eth]an; pref. be- + neo[eth]an, ny[eth]an,
   downward, beneath, akin to E. nether. See Nether.]
   1. Lower in place, with something directly over or on; under;
      underneath; hence, at the foot of. "Beneath the mount."
      --Ex. xxxii. 19.
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            Beneath a rude and nameless stone he lies. --Pope.
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   2. Under, in relation to something that is superior, or that
      oppresses or burdens.
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            Our country sinks beneath the yoke.   --Shak.
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   3. Lower in rank, dignity, or excellence than; as, brutes are
      beneath man; man is beneath angels in the scale of beings.
      Hence: Unworthy of; unbecoming.
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            He will do nothing that is beneath his high station.
                                                  --Atterbury.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Beneath \Be*neath"\, adv.
   1. In a lower place; underneath.
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            The earth you take from beneath will be barren.
                                                  --Mortimer.
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   2. Below, as opposed to heaven, or to any superior region or
      position; as, in earth beneath.
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