beyond


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Beyond \Be*yond"\, adv.
   Further away; at a distance; yonder.
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         Lo, where beyond he lyeth languishing.   --Spenser.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Beyond \Be*yond"\, prep. [OE. biyonde, bi[yogh]eonde, AS.
   begeondan, prep. and adv.; pref. be- + geond yond, yonder.
   See Yon, Yonder.]
   1. On the further side of; in the same direction as, and
      further on or away than.
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            Beyond that flaming hill.             --G. Fletcher.
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   2. At a place or time not yet reached; before.
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            A thing beyond us, even before our death. --Pope.
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   3. Past, out of the reach or sphere of; further than; greater
      than; as, the patient was beyond medical aid; beyond one's
      strength.
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   4. In a degree or amount exceeding or surpassing; proceeding
      to a greater degree than; above, as in dignity,
      excellence, or quality of any kind. "Beyond expectation."
      --Barrow.
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            Beyond any of the great men of my country. --Sir P.
                                                  Sidney.
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   Beyond sea. (Law) See under Sea.

   To go beyond, to exceed in ingenuity, in research, or in
      anything else; hence, in a bed sense, to deceive or
      circumvent.
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            That no man go beyond and defraud his brother in any
            matter.                               --1 Thess. iv.
                                                  6.
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