cage


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Cage \Cage\, n. [F. cage, fr. L. cavea cavity, cage, fr. cavus
   hollow. Cf. Cave, n., Cajole, Gabion.]
   [1913 Webster]
   1. A box or inclosure, wholly or partly of openwork, in wood
      or metal, used for confining birds or other animals.
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            In his cage, like parrot fine and gay. --Cowper.
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   2. A place of confinement for malefactors --Shak.
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            Stone walls do not a prison make,
            Nor iron bars a cage.                 --Lovelace.
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   3. (Carp.) An outer framework of timber, inclosing something
      within it; as, the cage of a staircase. --Gwilt.
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   4. (Mach.)
      (a) A skeleton frame to limit the motion of a loose piece,
          as a ball valve.
      (b) A wirework strainer, used in connection with pumps and
          pipes.
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   5. The box, bucket, or inclosed platform of a lift or
      elevator; a cagelike structure moving in a shaft.
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   6. (Mining) The drum on which the rope is wound in a hoisting
      whim.
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   7. (Baseball) The catcher's wire mask.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Cage \Cage\ (k[=a]j), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Caged (k[=a]jd); p.
   pr. & vb. n. Caging.]
   To confine in, or as in, a cage; to shut up or confine.
   "Caged and starved to death." --Cowper.
   [1913 Webster]
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