cape


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Cape \Cape\ (k[=a]p), n. [F. cap, fr. It. capo head, cape, fr.
   L. caput heat, end, point. See Chief.]
   A piece or point of land, extending beyond the adjacent coast
   into the sea or a lake; a promontory; a headland.
   [1913 Webster]

   Cape buffalo (Zool.) a large and powerful buffalo of South
      Africa (Bubalus Caffer). It is said to be the most
      dangerous wild beast of Africa. See Buffalo, 2.

   Cape jasmine, Cape jessamine. See Jasmine.

   Cape pigeon (Zool.), a petrel (Daptium Capense) common
      off the Cape of Good Hope. It is about the size of a
      pigeon.

   Cape wine, wine made in South Africa [Eng.]

   The Cape, the Cape of Good Hope, in the general sense of
      the southern extremity of Africa. Also used of Cape Horn,
      and, in New England, of Cape Cod.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Cape \Cape\, v. i. (Naut.)
   To head or point; to keep a course; as, the ship capes
   southwest by south.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Cape \Cape\, n. [OE. Cape, fr. F. cape; cf. LL. cappa. See
   Cap, and cf. 1st Cope, Chape.]
   A sleeveless garment or part of a garment, hanging from the
   neck over the back, arms, and shoulders, but not reaching
   below the hips. See Cloak.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Cape \Cape\, v. i. [See Gape.]
   To gape. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
   [1913 Webster] Capel
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