chew


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

chew \chew\ (ch[udd]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Chewed (ch[udd]d);
   p. pr. & vb. n. Chewing.] [As ce['o]wan, akin to D. kauwen,
   G. kauen. Cf. Chaw, Jaw.]
   1. To bite and grind with the teeth; to masticate.
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   2. To ruminate mentally; to meditate on.
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            He chews revenge, abjuring his offense. --Prior.
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   To chew the cud, to chew the food over again, as a cow; to
      ruminate; hence, to meditate.
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            Every beast the parteth the hoof, and cleaveth the
            cleft into two claws, and cheweth the cud among the
            beasts, that ye shall eat.            --Deut. xxiv.
                                                  6.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Chew \Chew\, v. i.
   To perform the action of biting and grinding with the teeth;
   to ruminate; to meditate.
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         old politicians chew wisdom past.        --Pope.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Chew \Chew\, n.
   That which is chewed; that which is held in the mouth at
   once; a cud. [Law]
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