context


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Context \Con*text"\, a. [L. contextus, p. p. of contexere to
   weave, to unite; con- + texere to weave. See Text.]
   Knit or woven together; close; firm. [Obs.]
   [1913 Webster]

         The coats, without, are context and callous. --Derham.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Context \Con"text\, n. [L. contextus; cf. F. contexte .]
   The part or parts of something written or printed, as of
   Scripture, which precede or follow a text or quoted sentence,
   or are so intimately associated with it as to throw light
   upon its meaning.
   [1913 Webster]

         According to all the light that the contexts afford.
                                                  --Sharp.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Context \Con*text"\, v. t.
   To knit or bind together; to unite closely. [Obs.] --Feltham.
   [1913 Webster]

         The whole world's frame, which is contexted only by
         commerce and contracts.                  --R. Junius.
   [1913 Webster]
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