crew


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Crew \Crew\ (kr[udd]),
   imp. of Crow.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Crew \Crew\ (kr[udd]), n. (Zool.)
   The Manx shearwater.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Crew \Crew\ (kr[udd]), n. [From older accrue accession,
   reenforcement, hence, company, crew; the first syllable being
   misunderstood as the indefinite article. See Accrue,
   Crescent.]
   1. A company of people associated together; an assemblage; a
      throng.
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            There a noble crew
            Of lords and ladies stood on every side. --Spenser.
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            Faithful to whom? to thy rebellious crew? --Milton.
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   2. The company of seamen who man a ship, vessel, or at; the
      company belonging to a vessel or a boat.
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   Note: The word crew, in law, is ordinarily used as equivalent
         to ship's company, including master and other officers.
         When the master and other officers are excluded, the
         context always shows it. --Story. --Burrill.
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   3. In an extended sense, any small body of men associated for
      a purpose; a gang; as (Naut.), the carpenter's crew; the
      boatswain's crew.

   Syn: Company; band; gang; horde; mob; herd; throng; party.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Crow \Crow\ (kr[=o]), v. i. [imp. Crew (kr[udd]) or Crowed
   (kr[=o]d); p. p. Crowed (Crown (kr[=o]n), Obs.); p. pr. &
   vb. n. Crowing.] [AS. cr[=a]wan; akin to D. kraijen, G.
   kr[aum]hen, cf. Lith. groti to croak. [root]24. Cf. Crake.]
   1. To make the shrill sound characteristic of a cock, either
      in joy, gayety, or defiance. "The cock had crown."
      --Bayron.
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            The morning cock crew loud.           --Shak.
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   2. To shout in exultation or defiance; to brag.
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   3. To utter a sound expressive of joy or pleasure.
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            The sweetest little maid,
            That ever crowed for kisses.          --Tennyson.
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   To crow over, to exult over a vanquished antagonist.
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            Sennacherib crowing over poor Jerusalem. --Bp. Hall.
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