crimson


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Crimson \Crim"son\ (kr[i^]m"z'n), n. [OE. crimson, OF.
   crimoisin, F. cramoisi (cf. Sp. carmesi.) LL. carmesinus, fr.
   Ar. qermazi, fr. qermez crimson, kermes, fr. Skr. k[.r]mija
   produced by a worm; k?mi worm or insect + jan to generate;
   akin to E. kin. CF. Carmine, Kermes.]
   A deep red color tinged with blue; also, red color in
   general.
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         Though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as white
         as snow; though they be red like crimson, they shall be
         as wool.                                 --Is. i. 18.
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         A maid yet rosed over with the virgin crimson of
         modesty.                                 --Shak.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Crimson \Crim"son\, a.
   Of a deep red color tinged with blue; deep red. "A crimson
   tide." --Mrs. Hemans.
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         The blushing poppy with a crimson hue.   --Prior.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Crimson \Crim"son\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Crimsoned (-z'nd); p.
   pr. & vb. n. Crimsoning.]
   To dye with crimson or deep red; to redden.
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         Signed in thy spoil and crimsoned in thy lethe. --Shak.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Crimson \Crim"son\, v. t.
   To become crimson; to blush.
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         Ancient towers . . . beginning to crimson with the
         radiant luster of a cloudless July morning. --De
                                                  Quincey.
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