crusade


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Crusade \Cru*sade"\ (kr?-s?d"), n. [F. croisade, fr. Pr.
   crozada, or Sp cruzada, or It. crociata, from a verb
   signifying to take the cross, mark one's self with a cross,
   fr. L. crux cross; or possibly taken into English directly
   fr. Pr. Cf. Croisade, Crosado, and see Cross.]
   1. Any one of the military expeditions undertaken by
      Christian powers, in the 11th, 12th, and 13th centuries,
      for the recovery of the Holy Land from the Mohammedans.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. Any enterprise undertaken with zeal and enthusiasm; as, a
      crusade against intemperance.
      [1913 Webster]

   3. A Portuguese coin. See Crusado.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Crusade \Cru*sade"\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Crusaded; p. pr. &
   vb. n. Crusading.]
   To engage in a crusade; to attack in a zealous or hot-headed
   manner. "Cease crusading against sense." --M. Green.
   [1913 Webster]
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