demolish


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Demolish \De*mol"ish\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Demolished; p. pr.
   & vb. n. Demolishing.] [F. d['e]molir, fr. L. demoliri, p.
   p. demolitus; de- + moliri to set a thing in motion, to work,
   construct, from moles a huge mass or structure. See Mole a
   mound, and Finish.]
   To throw or pull down; to raze; to destroy the fabric of; to
   pull to pieces; to ruin; as, to demolish an edifice, or a
   wall.
   [1913 Webster]

         I expected the fabric of my book would long since have
         been demolished, and laid even with the ground.
                                                  --Tillotson.

   Syn: To Demolish, Overturn, Destroy, Dismantle,
        Raze. That is overturned or overthrown which had stood
        upright; that is destroyed whose component parts are
        scattered; that is demolished which had formed a mass or
        structure; that is dismantled which is stripped of its
        covering, as a vessel of its sails, or a fortress of its
        bastions, etc.; that is razed which is brought down
        smooth, and level to the ground. An ancient pillar is
        overturned or overthrown as the result of decay; a city
        is destroyed by an invasion of its enemies; a monument,
        the walls of a castle, a church, or any structure, real
        or imaginary, may be demolished; a fortress may be
        dismantled from motives of prudence, in order to render
        it defenseless; a city may be razed by way of
        punishment, and its ruins become a memorial of
        vengeance.
        [1913 Webster]
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