deviate


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Deviate \De"vi*ate\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Deviated; p. pr. &
   vb. n. Deviating.] [L. deviare to deviate; de + viare to
   go, travel, via way. See Viaduct.]
   To go out of the way; to turn aside from a course or a
   method; to stray or go astray; to err; to digress; to
   diverge; to vary.
   [1913 Webster]

         Thus Pegasus, a nearer way to take,
         May boldly deviate from the common track. --Pope.

   Syn: To swerve; stray; wander; digress; depart; deflect; err.
        [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Deviate \De"vi*ate\, v. t.
   To cause to deviate. [R.]
   [1913 Webster]

         To deviate a needle.                     --J. D.
                                                  Forbes.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

deviate \de"vi*ate\ (d[=e]"v[-e]*[i^]t), a.
   having behavior differing from that which is normal or
   expected, especially in an undesirable or socially
   disapproved manner; as, deviate behavior.

   Syn: deviant. [PJC]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

deviate \de"vi*ate\ (d[=e]"v[-e]*[i^]t), n.
   a person having behavior differing from that which is normal
   or socially acceptable; -- used especially to characterize
   persons whose sexual behavior is considered morally
   unacceptable.

   Syn: deviant. [PJC]
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