devilfish


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Gray \Gray\ (gr[=a]), a. [Compar. Grayer; superl. Grayest.]
   [OE. gray, grey, AS. gr[=ae]g, gr[=e]g; akin to D. graauw,
   OHG. gr[=a]o, G. grau, Dan. graa, Sw. gr[*a], Icel. gr[=a]r.]
   [Written also grey.]
   1. any color of neutral hue between white and black; white
      mixed with black, as the color of pepper and salt, or of
      ashes, or of hair whitened by age; sometimes, a dark mixed
      color; as, the soft gray eye of a dove.
      [1913 Webster]

            These gray and dun colors may be also produced by
            mixing whites and blacks.             --Sir I.
                                                  Newton.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. Gray-haired; gray-headed; of a gray color; hoary.
      [1913 Webster]

   3. Old; mature; as, gray experience. -- Ames.
      [1913 Webster]

   4. gloomy; dismal.
      [PJC]

   Gray antimony (Min.), stibnite.

   Gray buck (Zool.), the chickara.

   Gray cobalt (Min.), smaltite.

   Gray copper (Min.), tetrahedrite.

   Gray duck (Zool.), the gadwall; also applied to the female
      mallard.

   Gray falcon (Zool.) the peregrine falcon.

   Gray Friar. See Franciscan, and Friar.

   Gray hen (Zool.), the female of the blackcock or black
      grouse. See Heath grouse.

   Gray mill or Gray millet (Bot.), a name of several plants
      of the genus Lithospermum; gromwell.

   Gray mullet (Zool.) any one of the numerous species of the
      genus Mugil, or family Mugilid[ae], found both in the
      Old World and America; as the European species
      (Mugilid[ae] capito, and Mugilid[ae] auratus), the
      American striped mullet (Mugilid[ae] albula), and the
      white or silver mullet (Mugilid[ae] Braziliensis). See
      Mullet.

   Gray owl (Zool.), the European tawny or brown owl ({Syrnium
      aluco}). The great gray owl (Ulula cinerea) inhabits
      arctic America.

   Gray parrot (Zool.), an African parrot ({Psittacus
      erithacus}), very commonly domesticated, and noted for its
      aptness in learning to talk. Also called jako.

   Gray pike. (Zool.) See Sauger.

   Gray snapper (Zool.), a Florida fish; the sea lawyer. See
      Snapper.

   Gray snipe (Zool.), the dowitcher in winter plumage.

   Gray whale (Zool.), a rather large and swift whale of the
      northern Pacific (Eschrichtius robustus, formerly
      Rhachianectes glaucus), having short jaws and no dorsal
      fin. It grows to a length of 50 feet (someimes 60 feet).
      It was formerly taken in large numbers in the bays of
      California, and is now rare; -- called also grayback,
      devilfish, and hardhead. It lives up to 50 or 60 years
      and adults weigh from 20 to 40 tons.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Gray whale \Gray whale\ (Zool.),
   a rather large and swift baleen whale of the northern Pacific
   (Eschrichtius robustus, formerly Rhachianectes glaucus),
   having short jaws and no dorsal fin; -- called also
   grayback, devilfish, and hardhead. It grows to a length
   of 50 feet (sometimes 60 feet). It was formerly taken in
   large numbers in the bays of California, and is now rare. It
   lives up to 50 or 60 years and adults weigh from 20 to 40
   tons.
   [1913 Webster + PJC]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

manta ray \manta ray\ n.
   An extremely large pelagic tropical ray of the family
   Mobulidae, that feeds on plankton and small fishes. It is
   usually harmless but its size (up to 20 feet across and up to
   a ton in weight) make it dangerous if harpooned. Called also
   manta, sea devil and devilfish. See also Cephaloptera
   and Sea devil.
   [WordNet 1.5 +PJC]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Devilfish \Dev"il*fish`\, n. (Zool.)
   (a) A huge ray (Manta birostris or Cephaloptera vampyrus)
       of the Gulf of Mexico and Southern Atlantic coasts.
       Several other related species take the same name. See
       Cephaloptera.
   (b) A large cephalopod, especially the very large species of
       Octopus and Architeuthis. See Octopus.
   (c) The gray whale of the Pacific coast. See Gray whale.
   (d) The goosefish or angler (Lophius), and other allied
       fishes. See Angler.
       [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Cephaloptera \Ceph`a*lop"te*ra\
   (s[e^]f`[.a]*l[o^]p"t[-e]*r[.a]), n. [NL., fr. Gr. kefalh`
   head + ptero`n wing.] (Zool.)
   One of the generic names of the gigantic ray ({Manta
   birostris}) of the family Mobulidae, known as devilfish,
   sea devil, manta and manta ray. It is common on the
   coasts of South Carolina, Florida, and farther south, and is
   sometimes found as far north as New York Bay. Some of them
   grow to enormous size, becoming twenty feet of more across
   the body, and weighing more than a ton.
   [1913 Webster]
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