dungeon


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

dungeon \dun"geon\ (d[u^]n"j[u^]n), n. [OE. donjoun highest
   tower of a castle, tower, prison, F. donjon tower or platform
   in the midst of a castle, turret, or closet on the top of a
   house, a keep of a castle, LL. domnio, the same word as LL.
   dominus lord. See Dame, Don, and cf. Dominion,
   Domain, Demesne, Danger, Donjon.]
   A close, dark prison, commonly, under ground, as if the lower
   apartments of the donjon or keep of a castle, these being
   used as prisons.
   [1913 Webster]

         Down with him even into the deep dungeon. -- Tyndale.
   [1913 Webster]

         Year after year he lay patiently in a dungeon. --
                                                  Macaulay.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Dungeon \Dun"geon\, v. t.
   To shut up in a dungeon. --Bp. Hall.
   [1913 Webster]
Feedback Form