evade


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Evade \E*vade"\ (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Evaded; p. pr. & vb.
   n.. Evading.] [L. evadere, evasum, e out + vadere to go,
   walk: cf. F. s'['e]vader. See Wade.]
   To get away from by artifice; to avoid by dexterity,
   subterfuge, address, or ingenuity; to elude; to escape from
   cleverly; as, to evade a blow, a pursuer, a punishment; to
   evade the force of an argument.
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         The heathen had a method, more truly their own, of
         evading the Christian miracles.          --Trench.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Evade \E*vade"\, v. t.
   1. To escape; to slip away; -- sometimes with from. "Evading
      from perils." --Bacon.
      [1913 Webster]

            Unarmed they might
            Have easily, as spirits evaded swift
            By quick contraction or remove.       --Milton.
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   2. To attempt to escape; to practice artifice or sophistry,
      for the purpose of eluding.
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            The ministers of God are not to evade and take
            refuge any of these . . . ways.       --South.

   Syn: To equivocate; shuffle. See Prevaricate.
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