fagot


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

fagot \fag"ot\ (f[a^]g"[u^]t) n. [F., prob. aug. of L. fax,
   facis, torch, perh. orig., a bundle of sticks; cf. Gr.
   fa`kelos bundle, fagot. Cf. Fagotto.]
   1. A bundle of sticks, twigs, or small branches of trees,
      used for fuel, for raising batteries, filling ditches, or
      other purposes in fortification; a fascine. --Shak.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. A bundle of pieces of wrought iron to be worked over into
      bars or other shapes by rolling or hammering at a welding
      heat; a pile.
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   3. (Mus.) A bassoon. See Fagotto.
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   4. A person hired to take the place of another at the muster
      of a company. [Eng.] --Addison.
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   5. An old shriveled woman. [Slang, Eng.]
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   Fagot iron, iron, in bars or masses, manufactured from
      fagots.

   Fagot vote, the vote of a person who has been constituted a
      voter by being made a landholder, for party purposes.
      [Political cant, Eng.]
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Fagot \Fag"ot\v. t. [imp. & p. p. Fagoted; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Fagoting.]
   To make a fagot of; to bind together in a fagot or bundle;
   also, to collect promiscuously. --Dryden.
   [1913 Webster]
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