flaw


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Flaw \Flaw\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Flawed; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Flawing.]
   1. To crack; to make flaws in.
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            The brazen caldrons with the frosts are flawed.
                                                  --Dryden.
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   2. To break; to violate; to make of no effect. [Obs.]
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            France hath flawed the league.        --Shak.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Flaw \Flaw\ (fl[add]), n. [OE. flai, flaw flake; cf. Sw. flaga
   flaw, crack, breach, flake, D. vlaag gust of wind, Norw.
   flage, flaag, and E. flag a flat stone.]
   1. A crack or breach; a gap or fissure; a defect of
      continuity or cohesion; as, a flaw in a knife or a vase.
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            This heart
            Shall break into a hundered thousand flaws. --Shak.
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   2. A defect; a fault; as, a flaw in reputation; a flaw in a
      will, in a deed, or in a statute.
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            Has not this also its flaws and its dark side?
                                                  --South.
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   3. A sudden burst of noise and disorder; a tumult; uproar; a
      quarrel. [Obs.]
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            And deluges of armies from the town
            Came pouring in; I heard the mighty flaw. --Dryden.
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   4. A sudden burst or gust of wind of short duration.
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            Snow, and hail, and stormy gust and flaw. --Milton.
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            Like flaws in summer laying lusty corn. --Tennyson.

   Syn: Blemish; fault; imperfection; spot; speck.
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