flow


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Flow \Flow\ (fl[=o]), obs.
   imp. sing. of Fly, v. i. --Chaucer.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Flow \Flow\ (fl[=o]), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Flowed (fl[=o]d); p.
   pr. & vb. n. Flowing.] [AS. fl[=o]wan; akin to D. vloeijen,
   OHG. flawen to wash, Icel. fl[=o]a to deluge, Gr. plw`ein to
   float, sail, and prob. ultimately to E. float, fleet.
   [root]80. Cf. Flood.]
   1. To move with a continual change of place among the
      particles or parts, as a fluid; to change place or
      circulate, as a liquid; as, rivers flow from springs and
      lakes; tears flow from the eyes.
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   2. To become liquid; to melt.
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            The mountains flowed down at thy presence. --Is.
                                                  lxiv. 3.
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   3. To proceed; to issue forth; as, wealth flows from industry
      and economy.
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            Those thousand decencies that daily flow
            From all her words and actions.       --Milton.
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   4. To glide along smoothly, without harshness or asperties;
      as, a flowing period; flowing numbers; to sound smoothly
      to the ear; to be uttered easily.
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            Virgil is sweet and flowingin his hexameters.
                                                  --Dryden.
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   5. To have or be in abundance; to abound; to full, so as to
      run or flow over; to be copious.
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            In that day . . . the hills shall flow with milk.
                                                  --Joel iii.
                                                  18.
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            The exhilaration of a night that needed not the
            influence of the flowing bowl.        --Prof.
                                                  Wilson.
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   6. To hang loose and waving; as, a flowing mantle; flowing
      locks.
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            The imperial purple flowing in his train. --A.
                                                  Hamilton.
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   7. To rise, as the tide; -- opposed to ebb; as, the tide
      flows twice in twenty-four hours.
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            The river hath thrice flowed, no ebb between.
                                                  --Shak.
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   8. To discharge blood in excess from the uterus.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Flow \Flow\, v. t.
   1. To cover with water or other liquid; to overflow; to
      inundate; to flood.
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   2. To cover with varnish.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Flow \Flow\, n.
   1. A stream of water or other fluid; a current; as, a flow of
      water; a flow of blood.
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   2. A continuous movement of something abundant; as, a flow of
      words.
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   3. Any gentle, gradual movement or procedure of thought,
      diction, music, or the like, resembling the quiet, steady
      movement of a river; a stream.
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            The feast of reason and the flow of soul. --Pope.
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   4. The tidal setting in of the water from the ocean to the
      shore. See Ebb and flow, under Ebb.
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   5. A low-lying piece of watery land; -- called also {flow
      moss} and flow bog. [Scot.] --Jamieson.
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