gate


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Gate \Gate\, v. t.
   1. To supply with a gate.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. (Eng. Univ.) To punish by requiring to be within the gates
      at an earlier hour than usual.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Gate \Gate\ (g[=a]t), n. [OE. [yogh]et, [yogh]eat, giat, gate,
   door, AS. geat, gat, gate, door; akin to OS., D., & Icel. gat
   opening, hole, and perh. to E. gate a way, gait, and get, v.
   Cf. Gate a way, 3d Get.]
   1. A large door or passageway in the wall of a city, of an
      inclosed field or place, or of a grand edifice, etc.;
      also, the movable structure of timber, metal, etc., by
      which the passage can be closed.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. An opening for passage in any inclosing wall, fence, or
      barrier; or the suspended framework which closes or opens
      a passage. Also, figuratively, a means or way of entrance
      or of exit.
      [1913 Webster]

            Knowest thou the way to Dover?
            Both stile and gate, horse way and footpath. --Shak.
      [1913 Webster]

            Opening a gate for a long war.        --Knolles.
      [1913 Webster]

   3. A door, valve, or other device, for stopping the passage
      of water through a dam, lock, pipe, etc.
      [1913 Webster]

   4. (Script.) The places which command the entrances or
      access; hence, place of vantage; power; might.
      [1913 Webster]

            The gates of hell shall not prevail against it.
                                                  --Matt. xvi.
                                                  18.
      [1913 Webster]

   5. In a lock tumbler, the opening for the stump of the bolt
      to pass through or into.
      [1913 Webster]

   6. (Founding)
      (a) The channel or opening through which metal is poured
          into the mold; the ingate.
      (b) The waste piece of metal cast in the opening; a sprue
          or sullage piece. [Written also geat and git.]
          [1913 Webster]

   Gate chamber, a recess in the side wall of a canal lock,
      which receives the opened gate.

   Gate channel. See Gate, 5.

   Gate hook, the hook-formed piece of a gate hinge.

   Gate money, entrance money for admission to an inclosure.
      

   Gate tender, one in charge of a gate, as at a railroad
      crossing.

   Gate valva, a stop valve for a pipe, having a sliding gate
      which affords a straight passageway when open.

   Gate vein (Anat.), the portal vein.

   To break gates (Eng. Univ.), to enter a college inclosure
      after the hour to which a student has been restricted.

   To stand in the gate or To stand in the gates, to occupy
      places or advantage, power, or defense.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Gate \Gate\, n. [Icel. gata; akin to SW. gata street, lane, Dan.
   gade, Goth. gatw["o], G. gasse. Cf. Gate a door, Gait.]
   1. A way; a path; a road; a street (as in Highgate). [O. Eng.
      & Scot.]
      [1913 Webster]

            I was going to be an honest man; but the devil has
            this very day flung first a lawyer, and then a
            woman, in my gate.                    --Sir W.
                                                  Scott.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. Manner; gait. [O. Eng. & Scot.]
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Geat \Geat\ (g[=e]t), n. [See Gate a door.] (Founding)
   The channel or spout through which molten metal runs into a
   mold in casting. [Written also git, gate.]
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Sash \Sash\, n. [F. ch[^a]ssis a frame, sash, fr. ch[^a]sse a
   shrine, reliquary, frame, L. capsa. See Case a box.]
   1. The framing in which the panes of glass are set in a
      glazed window or door, including the narrow bars between
      the panes.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. In a sawmill, the rectangular frame in which the saw is
      strained and by which it is carried up and down with a
      reciprocating motion; -- also called gate.
      [1913 Webster]

   French sash, a casement swinging on hinges; -- in
      distinction from a vertical sash sliding up and down.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Swing \Swing\, v. t.
   1. To cause to swing or vibrate; to cause to move backward
      and forward, or from one side to the other.
      [1913 Webster]

            He swings his tail, and swiftly turns his round.
                                                  --Dryden.
      [1913 Webster]

            They get on ropes, as you must have seen the
            children, and are swung by their men visitants.
                                                  --Spectator.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. To give a circular movement to; to whirl; to brandish; as,
      to swing a sword; to swing a club; hence, colloquially, to
      manage; as, to swing a business.
      [1913 Webster]

   3. (Mach.) To admit or turn (anything) for the purpose of
      shaping it; -- said of a lathe; as, the lathe can swing a
      pulley of 12 inches diameter.
      [1913 Webster]

   To swing a door, gate, etc. (Carp.), to put it on hinges
      so that it can swing or turn.
      [1913 Webster]
Feedback Form