gore


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Gore \Gore\, n. [OE. gore, gare, AS. g?ra angular point of land,
   fr. g?r spear; akin to D. geer gore, G. gehre gore, ger
   spear, Icel. geiri gore, geir spear, and prob. to E. goad.
   Cf. Gar, n., Garlic, and Gore, v.]
   1. A wedgeshaped or triangular piece of cloth, canvas, etc.,
      sewed into a garment, sail, etc., to give greater width at
      a particular part.
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   2. A small traingular piece of land. --Cowell.
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   3. (Her.) One of the abatements. It is made of two curved
      lines, meeting in an acute angle in the fesse point.
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   Note: It is usually on the sinister side, and of the tincture
         called tenn['e]. Like the other abatements it is a
         modern fancy and not actually used.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Gore \Gore\, n. [AS. gor dirt, dung; akin to Icel. gor, SW.
   gorr, OHG. gor, and perh. to E. cord, chord, and yarn; cf.
   Icel. g["o]rn, garnir, guts.]
   1. Dirt; mud. [Obs.] --Bp. Fisher.
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   2. Blood; especially, blood that after effusion has become
      thick or clotted. --Milton.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Gore \Gore\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Gored; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Goring.] [OE. gar spear, AS. g?r. See 2d Gore.]
   To pierce or wound, as with a horn; to penetrate with a
   pointed instrument, as a spear; to stab.
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         The low stumps shall gore
         His daintly feet.                        --Coleridge.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Gore \Gore\, v. t.
   To cut in a traingular form; to piece with a gore; to provide
   with a gore; as, to gore an apron.
   [1913 Webster]
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