grass


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Grass \Grass\ (gr[.a]s), n. [OE. gras, gres, gers, AS, gr[ae]s,
   g[ae]rs; akin to OFries. gres, gers, OS., D., G., Icel., &
   Goth. gras, Dan. gr[ae]s, Sw. gr[aum]s, and prob. to E.
   green, grow. Cf. Graze.]
   1. Popularly: Herbage; the plants which constitute the food
      of cattle and other beasts; pasture.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. (Bot.) An endogenous plant having simple leaves, a stem
      generally jointed and tubular, the husks or glumes in
      pairs, and the seed single.
      [1913 Webster]

   Note: This definition includes wheat, rye, oats, barley,
         etc., and excludes clover and some other plants which
         are commonly called by the name of grass. The grasses
         form a numerous family of plants.
         [1913 Webster]

   3. The season of fresh grass; spring. [Colloq.]
      [1913 Webster]

            Two years old next grass.             --Latham.
      [1913 Webster]

   4. Metaphorically used for what is transitory.
      [1913 Webster]

            Surely the people is grass.           --Is. xl. 7.
      [1913 Webster]

   5. Marijuana. [Slang]
      [PJC]

   Note: The following list includes most of the grasses of the
         United States of special interest, except cereals. Many
         of these terms will be found with definitions in the
         Vocabulary. See Illustrations in Appendix.
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Grass \Grass\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Grassed; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Grassing.]
   1. To cover with grass or with turf.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. To expose, as flax, on the grass for bleaching, etc.
      [1913 Webster]

   3. To bring to the grass or ground; to land; as, to grass a
      fish. [Colloq.]
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Grass \Grass\, v. i.
   To produce grass. [R.] --Tusser.
   [1913 Webster]
Feedback Form