groveling


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Grovel \Grov"el\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Groveledor Grovelled;
   p. pr. & vb. n. Groveling or Grovelling.] [From OE.
   grovelinge, grufelinge, adv., on the face, prone, which was
   misunderstood as a p. pr.; cf. OE. gruf, groff, in the same
   sense; of Scand. origin, cf. Icel. gr[=u]fa, in [=a] gr[=u]fu
   on the face, prone, gr[=u]fa to grovel.]
   1. To creep on the earth, or with the face to the ground; to
      lie prone, or move uneasily with the body prostrate on the
      earth; to lie flat on one's belly, expressive of
      abjectness; to crawl.
      [1913 Webster]

            To creep and grovel on the ground.    --Dryden.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. To tend toward, or delight in, what is sensual or base; to
      be low, abject, or mean.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

groveling \grov"el*ing\, grovelling \grov"el*ling\, a.
   Lying prone; low; debased; submissive in a self-abasing
   manner. "A groveling creature." --Cowper.

   Syn: cringing, wormlike, wormy.
        [1913 Webster + WordNet 1.5]
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