hack


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hack \Hack\, v. t. (Football)
   To kick the shins of (an opposing payer).
   [Webster 1913 Suppl.]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hack \Hack\, v. i.
   To cough faintly and frequently, or in a short, broken
   manner; as, a hacking cough.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hack \Hack\, n.
   1. A notch; a cut. --Shak.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. An implement for cutting a notch; a large pick used in
      breaking stone.
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   3. A hacking; a catch in speaking; a short, broken cough.
      --Dr. H. More.
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   4. (Football) A kick on the shins, or a cut from a kick. --T.
      Hughes.
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   5. (Computers) A clever computer program or routine within a
      program to accomplish an objective in a non-obvious
      fashion.
      [PJC]

   6. (Computers) A quick and inelegant, though functional
      solution to a programming problem.
      [PJC]

   7. A taxicab. [informal]
      [PJC]

   Hack saw, a handsaw having a narrow blade stretched in an
      iron frame, for cutting metal.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hack \Hack\ (h[a^]k), n. [See Hatch a half door.]
   1. A frame or grating of various kinds; as, a frame for
      drying bricks, fish, or cheese; a rack for feeding cattle;
      a grating in a mill race, etc.
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   2. Unburned brick or tile, stacked up for drying.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hack \Hack\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hacked (h[a^]kt); p. pr. &
   vb. n. Hacking.] [OE. hakken, AS. haccian; akin to D.
   hakken, G. hacken, Dan. hakke, Sw. hacka, and perh. to E.
   hew. Cf. Hew to cut, Haggle.]
   1. To cut irregulary, without skill or definite purpose; to
      notch; to mangle by repeated strokes of a cutting
      instrument; as, to hack a post.
      [1913 Webster]

            My sword hacked like a handsaw.       --Shak.
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   2. Fig.: To mangle in speaking. --Shak.
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   3. (Computers) To program (a computer) for pleasure or
      compulsively; especially, to try to defeat the security
      systems and gain unauthorized access to a computer.
      [PJC]

   4. To bear, physically or emotionally; as, he left the job
      because he couldn't hack the pressure. [Colloq.]
      [PJC]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hack \Hack\, a.
   Hackneyed; hired; mercenary. --Wakefield.
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   Hack writer, a hack; one who writes for hire. "A vulgar
      hack writer." --Macaulay.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hack \Hack\, v. t.
   1. To use as a hack; to let out for hire.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. To use frequently and indiscriminately, so as to render
      trite and commonplace.
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            The word "remarkable" has been so hacked of late.
                                                  --J. H.
                                                  Newman.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hack \Hack\ (h[a^]k), n. [Shortened fr. hackney. See Hackney.]
   [1913 Webster]
   1. A horse, hackneyed or let out for common hire; also, a
      horse used in all kinds of work, or a saddle horse, as
      distinguished from hunting and carriage horses.
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   2. A coach or carriage let for hire; a hackney coach;
      formerly, a coach with two seats inside facing each other;
      now, usually a taxicab.
      [1913 Webster +PJC]

            On horse, on foot, in hacks and gilded chariots.
                                                  --Pope.
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   3. Hence: The driver of a hack; a taxi driver; a hackman.
      [PJC]

   3. A bookmaker who hires himself out for any sort of literary
      work; an overworked man; a drudge.
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            Here lies poor Ned Purdon, from misery freed,
            Who long was a bookseller's hack.     --Goldsmith.
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   4. A procuress.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hack \Hack\, v. i.
   1. To be exposed or offered to common use for hire; to turn
      prostitute. --Hanmer.
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   2. To live the life of a drudge or hack. --Goldsmith.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hack \Hack\, v. i.
   To ride or drive as one does with a hack horse; to ride at an
   ordinary pace, or over the roads, as distinguished from
   riding across country or in military fashion.
   [Webster 1913 Suppl.]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

taxicab \tax"i*cab\, n.
   an automobile with a professional driver which can be hired
   to carry passengers; -- also called a taxi, and informally
   called a cab or a hack. The driver of a taxicab is
   referred to as a cab driver or cabbie, and sometimes as a
   chauffeur or hackie.

   Note: Taxicabs may be engaged by a prior appointment made,
         e.g. by telephone, or they may cruise for passengers,
         i.e. they may drive in city streets and stop to pick up
         pasengers when they are signalled by a prospective
         passenger. The act of signalling a taxicab (usually by
         a wave of the arm) is often called

   to hail a cab or

   to flag down a cab.
      [PJC]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Heck \Heck\, n. [See Hatch a half door.] [Written also
   hack.]
   1. The bolt or latch of a door. [Prov. Eng.]
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   2. A rack for cattle to feed at. [Prov. Eng.]
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   3. A door, especially one partly of latticework; -- called
      also heck door. [Prov. Eng.] --Halliwell.
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   4. A latticework contrivance for catching fish.
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   5. (Weaving) An apparatus for separating the threads of warps
      into sets, as they are wound upon the reel from the
      bobbins, in a warping machine.
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   6. A bend or winding of a stream. [Prov. Eng.]
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   Half heck, the lower half of a door.

   Heck board, the loose board at the bottom or back of a
      cart.

   Heck box or Heck frame, that which carries the heck in
      warping.
      [1913 Webster]
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