hail


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hale \Hale\ (h[=a]l), a. [Written also hail.] [OE. heil, Icel.
   heill; akin to E. whole. See Whole.]
   Sound; entire; healthy; robust; not impaired; as, a hale
   body.
   [1913 Webster]

         Last year we thought him strong and hale. --Swift.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hail \Hail\, v. i.
   1. To declare, by hailing, the port from which a vessel sails
      or where she is registered; hence, to sail; to come; --
      used with from; as, the steamer hails from New York.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. To report as one's home or the place from whence one
      comes; to come; -- with from. [Colloq.] --C. G. Halpine.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hail \Hail\, interj. [See Hail, v. t.]
   An exclamation of respectful or reverent salutation, or,
   occasionally, of familiar greeting. "Hail, brave friend."
   --Shak.
   [1913 Webster]

   All hail. See in the Vocabulary.

   Hail Mary, a form of prayer made use of in the Roman
      Catholic Church in invocation of the Virgin. See {Ave
      Maria}.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hail \Hail\ (h[=a]l), n. [OE. hail, ha[yogh]el, AS. h[ae]gel,
   hagol; akin to D., G., Dan., & Sw. hagel; Icel. hagl; cf. Gr.
   ka`chlhx pebble.]
   Small roundish masses of ice precipitated from the clouds,
   where they are formed by the congelation of vapor. The
   separate masses or grains are called hailstones.
   [1913 Webster]

         Thunder mixed with hail,
         Hail mixed with fire, must rend the Egyptian sky.
                                                  --Milton.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hail \Hail\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Hailed (h[=a]ld); p. pr. &
   vb. n. Hailing.] [OE. hailen, AS. hagalian.]
   To pour down particles of ice, or frozen vapors.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hail \Hail\, v. t.
   To pour forcibly down, as hail. --Shak.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hail \Hail\, a.
   Healthy. See Hale (the preferable spelling).
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hail \Hail\, v. t. [OE. hailen, heilen, Icel. heill hale, sound,
   used in greeting. See Hale sound.]
   1. To call loudly to, or after; to accost; to salute; to
      address.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. To name; to designate; to call.
      [1913 Webster]

            And such a son as all men hailed me happy. --Milton.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hail \Hail\, n.
   A wish of health; a salutation; a loud call. "Their puissant
   hail." --M. Arnold.
   [1913 Webster]

         The angel hail bestowed.                 --Milton.
   [1913 Webster]
Feedback Form