hale


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hale \Hale\ (h[=a]l), a. [Written also hail.] [OE. heil, Icel.
   heill; akin to E. whole. See Whole.]
   Sound; entire; healthy; robust; not impaired; as, a hale
   body.
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         Last year we thought him strong and hale. --Swift.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hale \Hale\, n.
   Welfare. [Obs.]
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         All heedless of his dearest hale.        --Spenser.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hale \Hale\ (h[=a]l or h[add]l; 277), v. t. [imp. & p. p.
   Haled (h[=a]ld or h[add]ld); p. pr. & vb. n. Haling.]
   [OE. halen, halien; cf. AS. holian, to acquire, get. See
   Haul.]
   To pull; to drag; to haul. See Haul. --Chaucer.
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         Easier both to freight, and to hale ashore. --Milton.
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         As some dark priest hales the reluctant victim.
                                                  --Shelley.
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