hatch


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hatch \Hatch\ (h[a^]ch), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hatched
   (h[a^]cht); p. pr. & vb. n. Hatching.] [F. hacher to chop,
   hack. See Hash.]
   1. To cross with lines in a peculiar manner in drawing and
      engraving. See Hatching.
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            Shall win this sword, silvered and hatched.
                                                  --Chapman.
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            Those hatching strokes of the pencil. --Dryden.
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   2. To cross; to spot; to stain; to steep. [Obs.]
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            His weapon hatched in blood.          --Beau. & Fl.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hatch \Hatch\, v. i.
   To produce young; -- said of eggs; to come forth from the
   egg; -- said of the young of birds, fishes, insects, etc.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hatch \Hatch\, n.
   1. The act of hatching.
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   2. Development; disclosure; discovery. --Shak.
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   3. The chickens produced at once or by one incubation; a
      brood.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hatch \Hatch\, v. t. [OE. hacchen, hetchen; akin to G. hecken,
   Dan. hekke; cf. MHG. hagen bull; perh. akin to E. hatch a
   half door, and originally meaning, to produce under a hatch.
   [root]12.]
   1. To produce, as young, from an egg or eggs by incubation,
      or by artificial heat; to produce young from (eggs); as,
      the young when hatched. --Paley.
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            As the partridge sitteth on eggs, and hatcheth them
            not.                                  --Jer. xvii.
                                                  11.
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            For the hens do not sit upon the eggs; but by
            keeping them in a certain equal heat they [the
            husbandmen] bring life into them and hatch them.
                                                  --Robynson
                                                  (More's
                                                  Utopia).
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   2. To contrive or plot; to form by meditation, and bring into
      being; to originate and produce; to concoct; as, to hatch
      mischief; to hatch heresy. --Hooker.
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            Fancies hatched
            In silken-folded idleness.            --Tennyson.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hatch \Hatch\, n. [OE. hacche, AS. h[ae]c, cf. haca the bar of a
   door, D. hek gate, Sw. h[aum]ck coop, rack, Dan. hekke
   manger, rack. Prob. akin to E. hook, and first used of
   something made of pieces fastened together. Cf. Heck,
   Hack a frame.]
   1. A door with an opening over it; a half door, sometimes set
      with spikes on the upper edge.
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            In at the window, or else o'er the hatch. --Shak.
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   2. A frame or weir in a river, for catching fish.
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   3. A flood gate; a sluice gate. --Ainsworth.
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   4. A bedstead. [Scot.] --Sir W. Scott.
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   5. An opening in the deck of a vessel or floor of a warehouse
      which serves as a passageway or hoistway; a hatchway;
      also; a cover or door, or one of the covers used in
      closing such an opening.
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   6. (Mining) An opening into, or in search of, a mine.
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   Booby hatch, Buttery hatch, Companion hatch, etc. See
      under Booby, Buttery, etc.

   To batten down the hatches (Naut.), to lay tarpaulins over
      them, and secure them with battens.

   To be under hatches, to be confined below in a vessel; to
      be under arrest, or in slavery, distress, etc.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hatch \Hatch\, v. t.
   To close with a hatch or hatches.
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         'T were not amiss to keep our door hatched. --Shak.
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