herd


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Herd \Herd\, n. [OE. hirde, herde, heorde, AS. hirde, hyrde,
   heorde; akin to G. hirt, hirte, OHG. hirti, Icel. hir?ir, Sw.
   herde, Dan. hyrde, Goth. ha['i]rdeis. See 2d Herd.]
   One who herds or assembles domestic animals; a herdsman; --
   much used in composition; as, a shepherd; a goatherd, and the
   like. --Chaucer.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Herd \Herd\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Herded; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Herding.] [See 2d Herd.]
   1. To unite or associate in a herd; to feed or run together,
      or in company; as, sheep herd on many hills.
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   2. To associate; to ally one's self with, or place one's self
      among, a group or company.
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            I'll herd among his friends, and seem
            One of the number.                    --Addison.
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   3. To act as a herdsman or a shepherd. [Scot.]
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Herd \Herd\ (h[~e]rd), a.
   Haired. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Herd \Herd\ (h[~e]rd), n. [OE. herd, heord, AS. heord; akin to
   OHG. herta, G. herde, Icel. hj["o]r[eth], Sw. hjord, Dan.
   hiord, Goth. ha['i]rda; cf. Skr. [,c]ardha troop, host.]
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   1. A number of beasts assembled together; as, a herd of
      horses, oxen, cattle, camels, elephants, deer, or swine; a
      particular stock or family of cattle.
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            The lowing herd wind slowly o'er the lea. --Gray.
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   Note: Herd is distinguished from flock, as being chiefly
         applied to the larger animals. A number of cattle, when
         driven to market, is called a drove.
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   2. A crowd of low people; a rabble.
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            But far more numerous was the herd of such
            Who think too little and who talk too much.
                                                  --Dryden.
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            You can never interest the common herd in the
            abstract question.                    --Coleridge.
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   Herd's grass (Bot.), one of several species of grass,
      highly esteemed for hay. See under Grass.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Herd \Herd\, v. t.
   To form or put into a herd.
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