hound


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hound \Hound\, n. [OE. hound, hund, dog, AS. hund; akin to OS. &
   OFries. hund, D. hond, G. hund, OHG. hunt, Icel. hundr, Dan.
   & Sw. hund, Goth. hunds, and prob. to Lith. sz?, Ir. & Gael.
   cu, L. canis, Gr. ?, ?, Skr. [,c]van. [root]229. Cf.
   Canine, Cynic, Kennel.]
   1. (Zool.) A variety of the domestic dog, usually having
      large, drooping ears, esp. one which hunts game by scent,
      as the foxhound, bloodhound, deerhound, but also used for
      various breeds of fleet hunting dogs, as the greyhound,
      boarhound, etc.
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            Hounds and greyhounds, mongrels, spaniels, curs.
                                                  --Shak.
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   2. A despicable person. "Boy! false hound!" --Shak.
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   3. (Zool.) A houndfish.
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   4. pl. (Naut.) Projections at the masthead, serving as a
      support for the trestletrees and top to rest on.
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   5. A side bar used to strengthen portions of the running gear
      of a vehicle.
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   To follow the hounds, to hunt with hounds.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hound \Hound\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hounded; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Hounding.]
   1. To set on the chase; to incite to pursuit; as, to hounda
      dog at a hare; to hound on pursuers. --Abp. Bramhall.
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   2. To hunt or chase with hounds, or as with hounds.
      --L'Estrange.
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