hundred


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hundred \Hun"dred\ (h[u^]n"dr[e^]d), n. [OE. hundred, AS.
   hundred a territorial division; hund hundred + a word akin to
   Goth. ga-ra[thorn]jan to count, L. ratio reckoning, account;
   akin to OS. hunderod, hund, D. hondred, G. hundert, OHG. also
   hunt, Icel. hundra[eth], Dan. hundrede, Sw. hundra, hundrade,
   Goth. hund, Lith. szimtas, Russ. sto, W. cant, Ir. cead, L.
   centum, Gr. "ekato`s, Skr. [,c]ata. [root]309. Cf. Cent,
   Century, Hecatomb, Quintal, and Reason.]
   1. The product of ten multiplied by ten, or the number of ten
      times ten; a collection or sum, consisting of ten times
      ten units or objects; five score. Also, a symbol
      representing one hundred units, as 100 or C.
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            With many hundreds treading on his heels. --Shak.
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   Note: The word hundred, as well as thousand, million, etc.,
         often takes a plural form. We may say hundreds, or many
         hundreds, meaning individual objects or units, but with
         an ordinal numeral adjective in constructions like five
         hundreds, or eight hundreds, it is usually intended to
         consider each hundred as a separate aggregate; as, ten
         hundreds are one thousand.
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   2. A division of a country in England, supposed to have
      originally contained a hundred families, or freemen.
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   Hundred court, a court held for all the inhabitants of a
      hundred. [Eng.] --Blackstone.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hundred \Hun"dred\, a.
   Ten times ten; five score; as, a hundred dollars.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Barony \Bar"o*ny\, n.; pl. Baronies. [OF. baronie, F.
   baronnie, LL. baronia. See Baron.]
   1. The fee or domain of a baron; the lordship, dignity, or
      rank of a baron.
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   2. In Ireland, a territorial division, corresponding nearly
      to the English hundred, and supposed to have been
      originally the district of a native chief. There are 252
      of these baronies. In Scotland, an extensive freehold. It
      may be held by a commoner. --Brande & C.
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