hussy


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Housewife \House"wife`\, n. [House + wife. Cf. Hussy.]
   1. The wife of a householder; the mistress of a family; the
      female head of a household. --Shak.
      [1913 Webster]

            He a good husband, a good housewife she. --Dryden.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. (Usually pronounced ?.) [See Hussy, in this sense.] A
      little case or bag for materials used in sewing, and for
      other articles of female work; -- called also hussy.
      [Written also huswife.] --P. Skelton.
      [1913 Webster]

   3. A hussy. [R.] [Usually written huswife.] --Shak.
      [1913 Webster]

   Sailor's housewife, a ditty-bag. Housewife
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hussy \Hus"sy\, n. [Contr. fr. huswife.]
   1. A housewife or housekeeper. [Obs.]
      [1913 Webster]

   2. A worthless woman or girl; a forward wench; a jade; --
      used as a term of contempt or reproach. --Grew.
      [1913 Webster]

   3. A pert girl; a frolicsome or sportive young woman; -- used
      jocosely. --Goldsmith.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hussy \Hus"sy\, n. [From Icel. h?si a case, prob. fr. h?s house.
   See House, and cf. Housewife a bag, Huswife a bag.]
   A case or bag. See Housewife, 2.
   [1913 Webster]
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